Thursday, 3 April 2014

* snow pillow *










































Hand sewn patchwork pillow made from old tourist table cloth (bought in the 1960' by my grandfather) in Greenland. From the top; front, back, test piece, middle part of the original design followed by images from the border. 40cm x 40cm

Friday, 18 October 2013

+ MN*LS +

The show opened last night in Vienna, and all my hand sewn patchwork pillows made it there, sadly I couldn't. Maybe some other time...

Wednesday, 2 October 2013

- hexagonal test (sampler) urn -


Trying out a new shape of urn using hexagonal pieces. This one was made with a traditional sampler in mind; the 2nd hand fabric was selected for the drawing like patterns. It's a little more rough than the previous urns as I had to do a lot of the sewing on the exterior due to the inflexibility of the form. Might try to make a lid for it..

Tuesday, 1 October 2013

+ hand-sewn patchwork pillow part #012 +


last hand-sewn patchwork pillow sent off to Vienna for the show at MN*LS opening this weekend! This one too, like the previous ones, is made from an old 2nd hand table cloth.

Thursday, 12 September 2013

+ hand-sewn patchwork pillow part #011 +






Last of the pillow photos for now; they should arrive in the next couple of days in Vienna at  MN*LS. The rabbit is a left over from the old series of critters made some time ago; now there's only smithereens left of the blue tablecloth....

+ hand-sewn patchwork pillow part #010 +























This little pillow is made from the last scraps from the same blue tablecloth as the previous pillow, and this one too is on its way to MS*LS in Vienna as I type this, for the exhibition opening later this month.
Similar to some of the patchwork urns, I used the existing label from the tablecloth and added it to the pillow next to my own label.

As for the previous ones, the extract from the press release says;  

'Using old 2nd hand woven tablecloths found in Danish thrift stores the pillowcases display, on one side, the original pattern of the unaltered tablecloth, and on the other side, a new pattern resulting from manipulated the fabric. This way the old cloth has been given a new function and a new visual identity moving away from the traditional Scandinavian 1950's designs towards a more exotic look.'